Tag Archives: Bantam

Look Who’s Here!

I was going to write a post about my friend Stephanie’s visiting bantam chicks.  I mean they’re tiny.  And super cute.  See:

Stephanie's chicks

Spring Break visitors: 8 bantam chicks

But, ever since the demise of the roosters, I’ve been waiting for the day we could have chicks.  That day is today!  Tony over at Traverse City Urban Chickens coordinated the chick order for us.  We placed the order a long time ago but because of the numbers and varieties of chicks we selected, we had to wait until now for the “stars to align”.  Our chicks hatched yesterday and arrived this morning.  Nine little girls in a box. 

Little box of baby chcikens.

The box the babes popped out of.

The little box is so cute.  Tony let me take it to transport my three girls home from his house.  He has pictures of all the girls in the box and of the girls shortly after their arrival here.  He also has an amazing brooder that I’m sure he’ll share some pictures of when he gets a minute.

We’re reusing the guinea pig cage brooder that we used for our first four chicks, but I gotta tell ya, day-old-chicks are so much cuter than month-old-chicks.

My three little chicks in the brooder.

They like to stand in the food to eat but the chick feeder is way too big right now.

Our day-old chicks are already as big as Steph’s banty chicks but they are all fluff.  It will take a while for their feathers to come in.  I’ll post pictures regularly, but don’t count on daily a la “Three Chicks a Day“; that’s been done already.  However, these girls are different varieties so the pics’ll be different even if I did opt to follow in Josh Elliot’s footsteps. 

When I ordered my chicks I chose them based on the characteristics of the adults.  I had forgotten what the chicks looked like and was surprised at how dark my little ladies are. 

Are you ready to meet them?

Hermione Granger

This is Hermione, a Golden-Laced Wyandotte.

"Loony" Luna Lovegood

Here's Luna Lovegood. I named her that because she'll lay "Loony" blue, green or pink eggs.

Bellatrix LeStrange

Bellatrix LeStrange. I hope she isn't evil like her namesake but she'll be black and white.

And, that is why I had to rename Chicken Cacciatore.  After we culled the roosters from our flock I started calling her Ginny for Ginny Weasley because she’s a Rhode Island Red.  But then I decided that  since she’s much older than all my new girls she should have a more mature name.  So, her permanent name is Molly Weasley after the matriarch of the Weasley clan. 

Molly in all her glory

Molly loves a dust bath.

I’ll introduce the girls to Molly when they’re a little bit older but for now they’re safe in their brooder.

7 Comments

Filed under urban chickens

Traverse City Urban Chickens Finally Get Some Press!

Girls on parade

Do you think being famous will go to their heads?

A couple of weeks ago I wrote a post called “Northern Express” about my interview with Noah Fowle discussing my chickens, and the growth of urban chicken farming since Traverse City changed its ordinance to allow residents to keep four hens.  Well, I’m excited to announce that the article has arrived!

Noah interviewed several chicken owners, soon-to-be chicken owners and city representatives, and discusses the many reasons people are interested in urban chicken farming from sustainable food to their novelty as pets.

If you’re in Traverse or the surrounding areas, keep an eye out for the latest edition. You can pick them up FREE all over town but it’s only out for a week, so get it while you can.   I plan to pick up a few copies for myself and my out-of-town family members.  But, you can also read the article by clicking here.  Enjoy!

3 Comments

Filed under urban chickens

Visitors (From a Week Ago . . . )

So it has been interesting to see the chicks fall into a pecking order.  Since Bleu and Parma are two weeks older than Catchy and Rice, they are bigger and have been using their size to their advantage.  I’m not sure that will last since I think Catchy and Rice will eventually be bigger than the other two but maybe the order will already be established when that happens. 

Last Thursday Stephanie and the kids brought their chicks over for the weekend because they were going out of town.  Chase’s two bantam chicks are the same age as our two little girls (three weeks at the time) but because they’re bantams, they’re smaller.  Even smaller than our reds.  This has done interesting things to The Order. 

Our girls plus two.

Our girls plus two.

Once Catchy and Rice noticed the two smaller chicks, they decided that  they were now “big girls” and started acting bossy.  They started standing taller and strutting around like they were queens of the hill.  We were a bit concerned at first for the safety of the little chicks but we monitored them for awhile until we decided they were ok and it all worked out well.  My dear hubby, Adam, was most concerned and thought the antics of Catchy and Rice were particularly humorous.   Periodically we would check in on the girls and find them paired off.  Two reds, two buffs and two bantams not socializing with one another.  Then we’d check in again and all six of them would be huddled together en masse. 

The kids loved having the “little” chickens.  They love our girls, but the extra chickiness (is that a word??) of the bantams was appealing.  They were always carrying a chick around and Gwen sat in the living room holding one on several occasions. 

Chase thinks one of his chicks is a rooster.  I think he’s probably right, but I’m no expert.  Either way, it’s ok. 

The girls and guests.

The girls and guests.

They don’t live in town so he’s allowed to keep a roo.  Plus, he wants a rooster for his 4-H project.   One of his chicks has a much more developed comb than the other.  I’m still hopeful that ours are all hens but since the combs are developing at the same rate, they could all be roosters.  That would be bad. 

In the end I don’t think the visit affected the order, but lately Parmesan seems to be edging Cordon Bleu out for the top spot.

5 Comments

Filed under urban chickens